A renaissance reconsidered Reply

We don’t have very active economic history researchers in our School, but we are keen on following developments in this field and have a few proud members of the Economic History Society of South Africa. If you think that we have to know how we got here in order to know where we are going, you are going to find this post interesting (and you need to start following Johan’s blog)…

Johan Fourie's blog

AEHW The 2014 African Economic History Workshop, ably organised by Leigh Gardner (centre), kicks off at the LSE.

Last week I attended the African Economic History Workshop at the London School of Economics. It was an excellent workshop, with 40 high-quality papers presented and more than 70 attendees. That is remarkable growth if you consider the previous African Economic History Workshop I attended, in Geneva in 2012, attracted around 10 papers and perhaps not more than 25 participants.

EHRAfricaThe reasons for the renewed interest in African economic history is discussed in the introduction to a new special issue of the Economic History Review entitled The Renaissance of African Economic History, incidentally the same title I used in a blog post in October last year. African economies are rising, if you haven’t heard, and with it comes greater interest in understanding the long-term determinants of this rise in prosperity. For long, much of the literature focused on the…

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